Lazy October: Fall Fashion in Selfies 

As the kids probably no longer say, “It be like that sometimes.” I’m in college. I’m on the go. Cue hair flip. Sometimes I can only capture my outfits in the bathroom mirror on my way out the door. He is an overview of my October outfits from my bathroom mirror’s perspective and a few guest-mirrors.

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Crocheted ponchos are my trend-prediction for fall 2019.

I know you can’t see my jeans, but, don’t worry, they are the same ripped jeans as seen in almost all of the other selfies.

Review: Make Muse Feminist Magazine

What is Make Muse?


Make Muse is a feminist mag written by and for young women. It touches on social issues, beauty, politics, activism and more. The magazine is just budding⁠–the issue I’ve got my hands on is the second to ever be released. Essays, interviews, poetry and more can be read in Make Muse.

My Impression

What I liked most about Make Muse is a result of the fact that it is cultivated by its target audience. The articles are about topics young women actually care about, rather than what we are stereotypically taught we are supposed to care about. There is no BS about how to impress men or lose weight. Instead, there are articles about the empowerment of changing one’s hair, period activism, and “Self Care Ideas for When the Face Masks Stop Working.” The magazine contains articles that will make young women feel seen. It has articles that will teach you. Page 96 offers, “Why You Should Care About Feminist Social Capital.” The magazine is like the women it is written for and written by: it is smart.

One could argue that the magazine’s main fault is being a bit too cutting edge, at the expense of appearing appearing bandwagon-esque. I’d say that’s mostly a surface level critique. It has a lot more depth and unique ideas to offer than one might assume. I wouldn’t write it off.

The physical copy is sturdy. It reminds me more of a coffee table book than a traditional magazine. This is pretty common for smaller indie mags, though. Since they put out fewer issues, each issue is made with care and made to last. This one reminds me a bit of a younger woman’s Darling magazine.

Who Should Read Make Muse?


I’d recommend Make Muse for high school and college age women (or other gender identities who are interested in feminism). In fact, I think it would be a great gift for younger girls as a swap for the Cosmo they might be reaching for. (Do girls still read Cosmo? You get the idea.) So, I’d recommend it for you if you’re interested in activism, culture, and women’s issues from a young woman’s perspective. I’d also recommend it as a gift for any young woman, especially early high school age, in your life who would benefit from exposure to the thoughtful ideas this magazine sparks. 

Buy the print copy of the magazine here, or a discounted digital version of the first issue here. Head over to my instagram, because I’m giving away one copy for free!

There are also some online articles you can read, including an interesting column on “femintamacy” on their main website if you don’t have the money for an issue right now.

I Sew Because I Am an Artist (Not Because I Am a Woman)

Sometimes, I get a squirmy feeling in my chest when I tell people that I sew. It has less to do with me and more do with their reaction, which can go one of two ways: a very enthusiastic response about what a “classic” and “rare” woman I am, or a sort of sneer of confusion as to why I would want to partake of something considered part of women’s domestic past. These two responses land at opposite ends of the spectrum but are both rooted in the same misconception about what it means to be a sewist. Both see sewing as a submission to a woman’s traditional role in society, and both are wrong.

Assuming that I sew because I am trying to fulfill my role as “good woman” is not only insulting to women, but it is insulting to the craft. Often, popular understanding of what constitutes art is far too narrow. For most of my life when people asked me if I was “artsy” I felt compelled to tell them no, because I am not some type of painter or illustrator as people usually assume is attached to the title of artist.

Our culture leads us to believe creative activities historically associated with women, such as cooking and sewing, aren’t art. Yet, everything about them is artful. Art is not easily defined, and that is the way it should be. The only requirement I attach to the definition of art is creation. Sewing is creation. Looking at a rectangle of color and being able to envision it as something whole, to see exactly where I would place the darts and what accent colors would make it pop, to translate a piece of nothing into an expression of my being–I dare you to tell me it isn’t art.

Sometimes the people who reject sewing as art are well-meaning progressive women who just never want to be forced to squeeze into a traditional role. This fear of this forced assimilation is totally valid, but the way it is expressed is not helping anyone. It’s not feminist to reject and shame things that are traditionally feminine. Feminism is about the choice to express ourselves however we want. But it’s also about dissociating traditionally “feminine” things with negativity. That means supporting women and recognizing their artistic expression as valid, even if it is different from the way we choose to express ourselves. It’s an important act feminism to reclaim textile art as just that–art. Detach art from the gender binary. Give sewing the power and reverence it was neglected for far too long.

What other arts have we neglected because they are seen as feminine? Maybe we’ve never thought of our grandmas as artists but maybe they are the most artful members of our families.

I encourage you to give Faith Ringgold, Suzan Engler, and Toshiko MacAdam a search to see just how broad and innovative textile and fiber art can be.

Pink(ish) Everything

Surprise! I dyed my hair purple. Or pink. Whatever. I don’t need labels. What better way to debut my pink(ish) hair on my blog than with an entirely pink outfit?

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Listen, I know that it is frowned upon to wear an outfit composed entirely of one color, but it is secretly one of my favorite things to do. Maybe I just like to challenge myself to pull off an outfit that is kind of hard to pull off. Or, maybe I just like how extra cutesy I feel in head to toe pink.

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I’d like to offer some tips on rocking singular colored look, but it is pretty subjective. However, I do recommend making sure that the shades are very different. My sweater is very pale, while the roses on my shirt are hot pink, and my shoes are bubblegum. They compliment each other better this way than if they were more similar. If the shades are too close together, it just looks like you didn’t really know what you were doing, while choosing diverse shades of the color appears as a purposeful statement.

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To get my hair a lighter color, I used regular dye in a vibrant color which I diluted with hair conditioner until it was closer to the shade that I wanted. I have been having a reoccurring problem of hair dyes lying to me about their color. This dye is Punky Colors’ “plum” and it is a little pinker than I intended. I also tried the same brand’s “purple” and found that it was even more pink. However, I still enjoy the color and am finding that is staying in my hair fairly well through washes. Sometimes you just have to roll with the punches and rock it anyway. (Also, please note and appreciate that I am having a good eyeliner day in this picture.)

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My embroidered rose shirt was thrifted from Penny Pincher’s here in Joplin, which has since closed down, my baby pink cardigan is from Goodwill, and my pink Keds are from Goodwill, as well. The only non-thrifted piece of my outfit are these super comfy high-waisted jeans from Target. I like to keep it casual and cozy on days where I have to be in class most of the day. I keep it cute at the same time by choosing cozy pieces in my favorite colors, with fun prints and textures.

Today’s pictures were just taken around my campus because as school is heading into full swing, it becomes a little harder to find extra time to take pictures. (Not to mention the lack of cute locations in Joplin.) I hope you enjoyed my simple and slightly ridiculous outfit, none the less. 

Sister Style – Fall Fashion

Today I am introducing my sister, Lauren, who is entirely opposite of me and yet still my best friend. I wanted to feature her Thanksgiving outfit alongside mine to showcase how different styles can still compliment one another.

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My sister’s outfit is almost entirely thrifted. Like me, she is also pretty concerned with where all the clothes she owns were made. Her outfit passes the ethics test. I am really into the top she is wearing. It is a little hard to see from the pictures, but it is kind of shiny and iridescent. My outfit is second-hand besides the overalls which are from the Gap.

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Lauren and I have vastly different styles. I am very girly and playful, bordering on childish at times. She is always earth-toned and cool – a little dark, even. But I have always admired her style and, even if she rolls her eyes every once in a while, she loves mine too.

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Today I am at my grandparents’ cattle ranch, surrounded by the joyful hearts of family, friends, and even a few strangers. In the midst of all of this, I am thankful for my hospitable family who love and appreciate the quirks in me. I am thankful that I have grown up in a family, immediate and extended, that has always cultivated creativity.

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I am not giving as many details because I just felt like keeping it simple and focusing on the pictures today. (Pictures which were, once again, taken by my dear friend Julie Montoya.)

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I also wanted to show-off my fierce older sister, her epic bangs and butt-kickin’ mom jeans.

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I hope that this Thanksgiving day leaves your belly full of food and your heart full of love. If this holiday season is hard for you, I pray that you are able to hold on through it and know that you are deserving of love even if it feels far away.

 

 

Sunshine in November – Fall Fashion

 

Fun fact: this entire photo set was taken by my sister at a Panera Bread.

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These are the only pair of earrings I currently own and, honestly, they are the only pair I need. They jazz up any solid colored shirt I own, especially turtlenecks. I’m in love with turtlenecks and this shade of yellow. It’s so vibrant and warm and yet still totally appropriate for autumn. (Although, to be honest, I have never really cared much about trivial fashion “rules” for the seasons.)

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This day was fairly warm for a fall day, but still cold enough to manage a sweater. I kept a balance by wearing this sweater with high-waisted shorts, and these vintage knee-high socks for a little extra warmth.

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This outfit is entirely second-hand, from thrift shops, hand-me-downs and estate sales. It is channeling a some-what era confused vibe, landing mostly in the 1970s’, which is a favorite of mine right now.

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If your are looking for a pair of staple shoes for your wardrobe, saddle shoes are it. I can wear them with almost everything I own and they are super comfortable! I admit, people often confuse them for bowling shoes, but that is not as much of a insult to me as it was probably meant to be. I’ve got no beef with bowling shoes. Plus, these shoes can be worn all year round, rain or shine.

Whether the days are chilly or warm, I hope this week treats you well!

 

Lady Bug – Fall Fashion

Ah, yes, the time of year where the weather gets slightly colder (slowly, but surely), and my outfits become uncomfortably transitional. It is the fall outfit in the morning, summer outfit in the afternoon kind of whether here in the Midwest and my outfits reflect an attempt at some sort of balance.
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It’s not all bad, however, as I can wear mom-jeans that are short enough to show my cute socks. Socks are one of the most underrated accessories, in my opinion.

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This outfit was almost entirely thrifted, save the socks and shoes. The top is one of those amazingly comfortable and slightly clown-like old lady shirts from a random brand that I could never find in an actual store, but was lucky enough to stumble across at a local Goodwill. The jelly shoes were a gift from my sister and the ribbed, baby blue socks are one of the last Forever 21 items left in my wardrobe.DSCN0144 (2)

If you didn’t know, Forever 21 is pretty well-known for being unethical when it comes to factory work. They are also notorious for stealing small artists’ ideas and marketing them as their own. I love some adorably cheap fashion as much as the next person, so it took me a while to commit to not shopping there anymore, but I have finally stopped for good. There are still remnants in my wardrobe which I am slowly phasing out, but having been an ignorantly religious Forever 21 shopper throughout all of junior high and high school, it is harder to weed out than you’d think (no pun intended with my plant theme). All well, everyone has to start somewhere.